Consultancy for the baseline survey on Socio-Economic benefits of artisanal tuna fishery

The main aim of this assessment is to provide baseline information on socio-economic issues around artisanal tuna fishery in Mozambique.

Tuna is one of the most globally traded and consumed seafood. Due to the high demand for tuna and tuna-like species, the fishery is facing huge challenges with respect to sustainable exploitation across the globe. Bluefin tuna, for example, is near extinction, while albacore, in the Indian Ocean, is currently overfished and bigeye and yellow-fin tuna are approaching maximum sustainable yield levels. The tuna catch in the Indian Ocean is on the average over one million tons annually fetching approximately 3-4 billion Euro per annum. The Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region accounts for 70-80% of the Indian Ocean tuna catch, and about 20% of the global production. The tuna fishery could play an important role in the national economy of the respective developing coastal and island states in the WIO, as well as to the food security of their population; however, this potential has not been maximized.

It is reported that artisanal marine fishery contributes over 80% of the national marine fish production, being used as food or source of income to coastal fishing communities. However there is no adequate information on how much of these are tuna and or tuna-like species. This lack of information on artisanal tuna fishery hampers the development of adequate management and development options for maximizing the socio-economic benefits for the coastal states.

The main aim of this assessment is to provide baseline information on socio-economic issues around artisanal tuna fishery in Mozambique. The information generated will be used to inform policy and decision making process in order to help promote sustainable use, management and development of the artisanal tuna fishery in the countries of this region of the Indic Ocean.

WWF Mozambique
July 22, 2013
Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, Maputo, Moçambique